Coronavirus (COVID) Resource Center

As regulations are changing daily, we encourage you to contact the following resources directly for the latest and most up to date information. Please contact your Nisivoccia professional if you have additional questions.

Although we are working remotely, please know we are available to answer any questions you may have on your accounting, tax or audit matters. Do not hesitate to contact us via phone, video or email, if you need assistance navigating through the recent legislation, with your loan application or financial and budget process during these times.

Government Resources

News Items

2021 Individual Taxes: Answers to your questions about limits

February 18, 2021

Many people are more concerned about their 2020 tax bills right now than they are about their 2021 tax situations. That’s understandable because your 2020 individual tax return is due…

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7 Steps to Handle a Down Economy

February 17, 2021

One ramification of the COVID-19 pandemic has been a down economy that has affected many sectors of our society — including medical practices. Physicians have felt the effects as patients…

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What COVID-19 Might Mean for the Multifamily Sector

February 2, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a dramatic impact on almost every industry, including real estate. Owners, investors and developers already are seeing ripple effects across sectors. This article looks at…

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Changes to the Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERC)

January 19, 2021

The Consolidated Appropriations Act (the Act), which was signed into law on December 27, 2020, contains changes that allow many businesses previously ineligible for the employee retention tax credit to…

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Payroll Protection Program Second Round Funding (PPP2)

January 8, 2021

The Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (the Act) was signed into law on December 27, 2020. On January 6, 2021, the Treasury/SBA issued IRS revenue ruling 2021-02 regarding…

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Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, January 2021

January 7, 2021

The following information summarizes some of the major provisions of The Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (the Act) that was signed into law on December 27, 2020. Now…

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Resources for Small Businesses and Not-for-Profits.

Also refer to Navigating Your Business Through Coronavirus (COVID-19) above for additional information.

Resources for Small Businesses and Not-for-Profits.

The SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program provides small businesses with low interest loans of up to $2 million to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Refer to the links below for program information.

Resources for Small Businesses and Not-for-Profits.

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act expands the Family Medical and Leave Act (FMLA) and Paid Sick Leave requirements for most organizations under 500 employees.

Employers must provide eligible employees with up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave to care for their children.

  • Employees that have been on the payroll for at least 30 calendar days.
  • Employees that are unable to work, onsite or remote, because their child’s school or child care services is closed due to the public health emergency.
  • First 10 days of leave can be unpaid. Employees can use accrued time
  • For the other 10 weeks, employees must receive two-thirds of their regular rate of pay. This is capped at $200 a day.

Employers will have to provide up to 80 hours of paid-sick-leave to employees, regardless of the length of time that they have been employed. Paid sick-leave benefits will be available immediately.

Paid sick leave must be paid at the employee’s regular rate of pay, or minimum way, whichever is greater for any employee that:

  • Has been ordered to a federal, state, or local quarantine or isolation related to COVID-19
  • Has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine because of COVID-19
  • Has symptoms of COVID-19 and is seeking a medical diagnosis

Paid sick leave must be paid at two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate of pay, or minimum wage, whichever is greater for any employee that:

  • Is caring for someone who is subject to a government quarantine or isolation order or has been advised by a health care provider to quarantine or self-isolate.
  • Needs to care for their child whose school or child care services is closed due to COVID-19.
  • Is experiencing similar conditions as specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of Labor.

Paid sick leave is capped at $511 a day for an employee’s own care and $200 a day for employees caring for someone.

  • Organizations with less than 50 employees if providing paid family and medical leave and paid sick leave would “jeopardize the viability of the business”
  • Excludes health care providers and emergency responders. This is subject to change as smaller healthcare offices may qualify.
  • Organizations with less than 25 employees do not have to reinstate employees in the same or equivalent position if the position no longer exists.

Also under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, employers who pay sick or family leave under the act, can begin taking advantage of two new refundable payroll tax credits, designed to immediately and fully reimburse them, dollar-for-dollar, for the cost of providing Coronavirus (COVID-19) related leave to their employees.

Examples

If an eligible employer paid $5,000 in sick leave and is otherwise required to deposit $8,000 in payroll taxes, including taxes withheld from all its employees, the employer could use up to $5,000 of the $8,000 of taxes it was going to deposit for making qualified leave payments. The employer would only be required under the law to deposit the remaining $3,000 on its next regular deposit date.

If an eligible employer paid $10,000 in sick leave and was required to deposit $8,000 in taxes, the employer could use the entire $8,000 of taxes in order to make qualified leave payments and file a request for an accelerated credit for the remaining $2,000.

Equivalent child care leave and sick leave credit amounts are available to self-employed individuals under similar circumstances. These credits will be claimed on their income tax return and will reduce estimated tax payments.

Additional Government Resources